The Marin Post

The Voice of the Community

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UTA

Bee populations are collapsing at an alarming rate - You can help

The Franklin's bumblebee – an important pollinator last seen in the wild in 2006 – is on the brink of extinction. Bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides, climate change, pollution and habitat loss are key drivers of the rapid decline in honeybee populations, including the Franklin's bumblebee.

If this species were to go extinct, it would spell massive trouble for native plants on the West Coast such as the lupine, California Poppy and horsemint because the Franklin’s bumblebee is a vital pollinator.

Despite the visible decline of this species, it’s taken the Fish and Wildlife Service over a decade to consider protecting it under the Endangered Species Act. Endangered status would help minimize the impacts of habitat loss, disease and pesticide exposure. This would ensure that future generations get to enjoy the same beautiful wildflowers.

Unfortunately, the Franklin’s bumblebee isn’t alone in being at risk of extinction. The rusty patched bumblebee has been considered endangered for two years. 7 different Hawaiian bee species are listed. With so many pollinator species in decline, we need the Fish and Wildlife Service to step up and protect them.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is currently considering listing the Franklin's bumblebee as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act.

Hundreds of thousands have spoken out to protect bee populations, but more need to speak out to ensure the FWS hears the message loud and clear.

Will you sign this important petition from our allies at Friends of the Earth urging the Fish and Wildlife Service to place the Franklin's bumblebee on the endangered species list? Click here to sign the petition now.